Foreshore dog off-leash area

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Brisbane City Council is creating more to see and do in a clean and green Brisbane by making our city liveable and sustainable for future generations.

Council is pleased to announce three sites for the trial of dog off-leash areas on the Brisbane foreshore. The Foreshore Dog Off-Leash Area project aims to improve environmental outcomes and shorebird protection, as well as create recreational opportunities for dog-owners along popular foreshore areas.

The Brisbane foreshore is part of the Moreton Bay Marine Park. The foreshore is the land between high and low tide mark along Moreton Bay and is one of our city’s most outstanding natural assets. It plays an important social and recreational role for the local and wider community.

There are three pilot sites on the foreshore at:

  • Manly - the beach area at the end of Davenport Drive, between the southern rock wall and the northern rock wall and boundary fence
  • Nudgee Beach - from the main boat ramp at Nudgee Beach Reserve car park south to Kedron Brook
  • Sandgate - between the stairs to the foreshore located near the corner of Flinders Parade and Second Avenue and the corner of Park Parade and Zeehan Street at Shorncliffe.

These trial sites align with and will be the pilot project for the new Queensland Government Department of Environment and Science draft guideline for establishing dog off-leash sites in marine parks. Council and the University of Queensland (UQ) selected the off-leash areas using UQ shorebird research.


Brisbane City Council is creating more to see and do in a clean and green Brisbane by making our city liveable and sustainable for future generations.

Council is pleased to announce three sites for the trial of dog off-leash areas on the Brisbane foreshore. The Foreshore Dog Off-Leash Area project aims to improve environmental outcomes and shorebird protection, as well as create recreational opportunities for dog-owners along popular foreshore areas.

The Brisbane foreshore is part of the Moreton Bay Marine Park. The foreshore is the land between high and low tide mark along Moreton Bay and is one of our city’s most outstanding natural assets. It plays an important social and recreational role for the local and wider community.

There are three pilot sites on the foreshore at:

  • Manly - the beach area at the end of Davenport Drive, between the southern rock wall and the northern rock wall and boundary fence
  • Nudgee Beach - from the main boat ramp at Nudgee Beach Reserve car park south to Kedron Brook
  • Sandgate - between the stairs to the foreshore located near the corner of Flinders Parade and Second Avenue and the corner of Park Parade and Zeehan Street at Shorncliffe.

These trial sites align with and will be the pilot project for the new Queensland Government Department of Environment and Science draft guideline for establishing dog off-leash sites in marine parks. Council and the University of Queensland (UQ) selected the off-leash areas using UQ shorebird research.


  • Benefits of Foreshore Dog Off-Leash Areas

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    8 months ago
    The Foreshore Dog Off-Leash Area project will provide Brisbane dog off-leash areas on the foreshore, creating an opportunity to:
    • protect environmental values, including migratory shorebirds and their habitat
    • engage the community about the importance of conserving migratory shorebirds and their habitat
    • provide opportunities for the community to walk their dogs off-leash on the foreshore in established areas
    • educate and enforce dogs remaining on-leash outside of these new established areas
    • educate the community about the importance of responsible pet ownership.
    Established dog off-leash areas along the foreshore may improve shorebird conservation by encouraging people to only walk dogs off-leash in selected...

    The Foreshore Dog Off-Leash Area project will provide Brisbane dog off-leash areas on the foreshore, creating an opportunity to:
    • protect environmental values, including migratory shorebirds and their habitat
    • engage the community about the importance of conserving migratory shorebirds and their habitat
    • provide opportunities for the community to walk their dogs off-leash on the foreshore in established areas
    • educate and enforce dogs remaining on-leash outside of these new established areas
    • educate the community about the importance of responsible pet ownership.
    Established dog off-leash areas along the foreshore may improve shorebird conservation by encouraging people to only walk dogs off-leash in selected areas and remain on-leash outside these areas, helping reduce shorebird disturbance along large extents of the foreshore.

    Dog Off-Leash Areas in Brisbane

    Across the city there are over 135 dog off-leash areas, providing many health benefits for both dogs and their owners.

    For more information about dog off-leash areas in Brisbane, visit Council’s dog off-leash areas page and search for a park near you.

  • What you need to know

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    8 months ago
    Shorebirds

    Shorebirds, also known as waders, gather in large numbers on Australian coastal and inland wetlands, including the beautiful Moreton Bay.

    • Migratory shorebirds visiting Australia from Siberia, Korea, China or Japan travel along the East Asian-Australasian flyway, travelling 13,000 kilometres to reach Brisbane.
    • Approximately, 40,000 migratory shorebirds arrive in Moreton bay during spring and summer every year.
    • The Moreton Bay region provides vitally important feeding and resting grounds to both residential and migratory shorebirds. This means shorebirds need the space, food and protection found at critical sites along the foreshore of Moreton Bay to rest...

    Shorebirds

    Shorebirds, also known as waders, gather in large numbers on Australian coastal and inland wetlands, including the beautiful Moreton Bay.

    • Migratory shorebirds visiting Australia from Siberia, Korea, China or Japan travel along the East Asian-Australasian flyway, travelling 13,000 kilometres to reach Brisbane.
    • Approximately, 40,000 migratory shorebirds arrive in Moreton bay during spring and summer every year.
    • The Moreton Bay region provides vitally important feeding and resting grounds to both residential and migratory shorebirds. This means shorebirds need the space, food and protection found at critical sites along the foreshore of Moreton Bay to rest and recover before making the long return journey home.
    • In 1998, Brisbane City Council and the City of Narashino, Japan signed the Narashino agreement to protect migratory shorebirds. Please visit Council’s shorebird web page to find out more https://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/clean-and-green/natural-environment-and-water/bushland-reserves/boondall-wetlands/shorebirds-of-brisbane

    Meandering mudflats

    Drop in and discover the importance of tidal zones within Moreton Bay. Join us for a guided walk exploring the migratory shorebirds’ habitat. Learn about the marathon flights these amazing birds undertake, and the international importance of the wetlands.


  • Responsible pet ownership

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    8 months ago

    Council encourages residents to take responsibility for their pets to ensure natural areas are protected.

    When using dog parks, it’s your obligation to make sure your dog:

    • is under control (e.g. your dog will return to you when called)
    • is not a nuisance to other dogs and their owners
    • droppings are disposed of in the bins provided
    • is registered with Council, wormed regularly and its vaccinations are up to date.

    Please click here to find out more about for breaches and fines with regards to Brisbane City Council’s animal law https://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/laws-and-permits/laws-and-permits-for-residents/animals-and-pets/cats-and-dogs/breaches-and-fines)

    You can help protect shorebirds

    Just one disturbance...

    Council encourages residents to take responsibility for their pets to ensure natural areas are protected.

    When using dog parks, it’s your obligation to make sure your dog:

    • is under control (e.g. your dog will return to you when called)
    • is not a nuisance to other dogs and their owners
    • droppings are disposed of in the bins provided
    • is registered with Council, wormed regularly and its vaccinations are up to date.

    Please click here to find out more about for breaches and fines with regards to Brisbane City Council’s animal law https://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/laws-and-permits/laws-and-permits-for-residents/animals-and-pets/cats-and-dogs/breaches-and-fines)

    You can help protect shorebirds

    Just one disturbance puts shorebirds to flight, burning their vital energy.
    • Observe shorebirds quietly from a distance.
    • Dogs can frighten shorebirds. Please keep dogs under control, including while on a leash. Fines apply.
    • Ensure your dogs are only off-leash in the established areas, and on-leash in all other areas.
    • Reduce vehicle and boat speed near shorebirds and keep well away from flocks.
    For more information about dog off-leash areas in Brisbane, as well as requirements for cat and dog owners, registration and renewals, permits, animal noise, breaches and fines, dangerous dogs and declared regulated animals and our lost and found animal register, please click here https://www.brisbane.qld.gov.au/laws-and-permits/laws-and-permits-for-residents/animals-and-pets/cats-and-dogs